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SPRING 2022  LAC one-hour courses

    • ARAB 308.001.  Arabic LAC: Public Health in the Middle East & North Africa   الصحة العامة في الشرق الأوسط

      Caroline Robinson

Prerequisite: Completion of Arabic 204, its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.  This is a stand-alone, one-hour per week Arabic recitation discussing major public health challenges in the Middle East and North Africa region. Students will consider the historical roots, key actors, and potential solutions to these challenges through the lenses of media coverage, academic research, and local and global public health campaigns.  No co-registration.

Duke students, native or heritage learners, and students not enrolled in any other Arabic courses are welcome to enroll. Please send any questions or request for additional information to the Arabic LAC instructor, Prof. Caroline Robinson, at robinsoc@email.unc.edu.

    • CHIN 308.001.  Chinese LAC

Luoyi Cai

Prerequistes: CHIN 305, or CHIN 212 for heritage students, or permission of the instructor.  In this stand-alone, one-hour LAC course conducted in Chinese, students will use the target language to study and discuss topics broadly related to modern China’s society.  A wide variety of authentic materials and in-depth discussions will cover politics, urban culture, history, and social issues.  The course will allow students to develop Chinese language skills comprehensively and especially to improve their proficiency in speaking and listening on extended abstract topics.  No co-registration.

    • HNUR 308.001.  Hindi-Urdu LAC: Journalism and Current Events

John Caldwell

Prerequistes: HNUR 203, placement, or permission of the instructor.  This stand-alone, one-hour LAC course conducted in Hindi-Urdu will discuss print and broadcast media reporting on current events in South Asia.  Materials will be sourced from Indian and Pakistani media outlets in Hindi-Urdu including Dainik Bhaskar, Dainik Jagaran, Amar Ujala, Jung, Geo News, Door Darshan, NDTV, and others. Students will learn how to analyze and critique journalistic reporting and acquire new perspectives on current events in South Asia.  No co-registration.

    • PORT 408.001.  Portuguese LAC: Contemporary Social Challenges in Brazil and Portugal

      Paulo Ferreira

      Prerequiste: Portuguese 204, its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.  This stand-alone, one-hour LAC discussion course In Portuguese examines the contemporary histories and cultures of Brazil and Portugal, focusing on social issues that are common to both countries, such as social and gender inequality, racial discrimination, and unemployment. Through the analysis of films, literary works, and other sources that put some of these problems in perspective, students will evaluate how Brazilian and Portuguese societies have evolved throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.  No co-registration

      This one-credit course can be taken in conjunction with the 1-credit series for students interested in 3-credits in Portuguese.

      GSLL 489.001.  Russian LAC: Language and Identity in Central Asia

      Meredith Doubleday

      Prerequiste: Russian 204 or permission of the instructor.  This stand-alone, one-hour LAC discussion course in Russian explores the nature of linguistic dynamics in Central Asia and their role in shaping identity in the region.  No co-registration.

    • SWAH 408.001.  Swahili LAC: Contemporary Health Issues in Africa

Mohamed Mwamzandi

Prerequiste: SWAH 403 or permission of the instructor.  In this stand-alone, one-hour LAC course in Swahili, students will explore contemporary health issues and other current affairs in Africa with some focus on East Africa. The course is designed to help students understand the basic health issues in Africa as well as develop their language skills in reading, listening, comprehension and writing of Swahili language. Students will examine how language and culture impact beliefs and behaviors, and how together, these impact health interventions.  No co-registration.

About LAC at UNC-CH

UNC-CH’s LAC Program offers students the opportunity to use world languages in a variety of courses outside the language and literature curricula.

The program aims to promote a better understanding of world regions while demonstrating the relevance of practical language skills across the disciplines.

Successful completion of a LAC course option will improve students’ ability to:

      1. Communicate in the target language about course topics;
      2. Describe how course topics relate to world regions that speak the target language;
      3. Explain course topics from the perspective(s) of individuals who use the target language;
      4. Use the target language to conduct course research.

 

There are several types of LAC courses:

LAC Recitation Sections are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language offered for lecture courses that require a recitation section. LAC recitation sections function like normal recitations except that selected readings and assignments are completed in the target language. Students who participate in a LAC recitation receive one additional graded hour of language credit by enrolling in the corresponding LAC language course (ARAB 308, FREN 308, GERM 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408) in addition to main course’s corresponding LAC recitation section.

 

Supplementary LAC Discussion Sections are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language linked to courses that do not normally require a recitation section. Supplementary LAC sections enable students to complete short readings and assignments related to the linked course in the target language. Students who participate in a supplementary LAC section receive one graded hour of language credit by enrolling in the LAC language course (ARAB 308, CHIN 508, FREN 308, GERM 388 or 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408).

 

Combined LAC Discussion Sections are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language. These are linked to two or more related courses offered during the same semester. Students complete short readings and assignments in the target language on interdisciplinary themes or issues common to the linked courses. Students who participate in a combined LAC discussion section receive one graded hour of language credit by enrolling in a LAC language course (ARAB 308, CHIN, 508, FREN 308, GERM 388 or 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408).

 

Stand-Alone LAC Discussion Sessions are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language. These are not linked to any other course, and so the content is determined by the LAC instructor. Students complete short readings and assignments in the target language on interdisciplinary themes or issues These course may have varying thematic focus. Students who participate in a stand-alone LAC discussion section receive one graded hour of language credit by enrolling in a LAC language course (ARAB 308, FREN 308, GERM 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408).

 

LAC Seminars are stand-alone three-credit courses taught entirely in the target language. Course identifiers may vary, so consult the present semester’s publicity or contact the LAC coordinator for current offerings.

 

LAC Research Components offer students the opportunity to complete course projects or papers in the target language, with assistance provided by a faculty member or graduate student. Students do not receive extra course credit, but are given a certificate of completion. Contact the LAC coordinator for current opportunities.

 

Teaching Associate Professor Michelle Gravatt currently serves as the point of contact for LAC courses. Please email her at gravatt@email.unc.edu with questions about the LAC program, to set up an appointment, learn about LAC teaching opportunities, or ask questions about what LAC courses are being offered and how to register. Please check this web page for updates.

Administration and Support

UNC-CH’s Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) program receives support from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as from six campus Title VI centers:

Diversity

The LAC Program supports the University’s core values encouraging diversity and equal educational and employment opportunities throughout the University community. These values are articulated in the University’s non-discrimination policy and by the office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.