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Spring 2023 LAC one-hour courses

    • ARAB 308.001.  Arabic LAC: Public Health in the Arabic-Speaking World

Caroline Robinson

This is a stand-alone, one-hour per week LAC course taught in Arabic discussing major public health challenges in the Middle East and North Africa region. Students will consider the historical roots, key actors, and potential solutions to these challenges through the lenses of media coverage, academic research, and local and global public health campaigns. No co-registration.

Duke students, native or heritage learners, and students not enrolled in any other Arabic courses are welcome to enroll.  Co-registration in another language course is not required.

Please send any questions or request for additional information to the Arabic LAC instructor, Prof. Caroline Sibley, at robinsoc@email.unc.edu.

    • HNUR 308.001.  Hindi-Urdu LAC: Journalism & Current Events

John Caldwell

This is a stand-alone, one-hour LAC course taught in Hindi-Urdu. No co-registration.  We will discuss print and broadcast media reporting on current events in South Asia.  Materials will be sourced from Indian and Pakistani media outlets in Hindi-Urdu including Dainik Bhaskar, Dainik Jagaran, Amar Ujala, Jung, Geo News, Door Darshan, NDTV, and others. We will also incorporate guest lectures by South Asian journalists and collaborations with journalism students in India and Pakistan. You will learn how to analyze and critique journalistic reporting and acquire new perspectives on current events in South Asia.

Mondays, 2:30pm-3:20pm.

Prerequisite:  HNUR 203, or placement. If you want to take this class but have not taken HNUR 203 or the Hindi-Urdu placement test, please contact the instructor.

    • KOR 308.001.  Korean LAC: Korean Food and Culture

Dongsoo Bang

This is a stand-alone, one-hour LAC discussion course conducted in Korean. No co-registration.  This course focuses on Korean food and culture of Korea. Students should study how these culinary traditions have related identity, religion, classes. Students will be asked to explore flavor principles, signature dishes & recipes, and other topics by applying assigned readings and critical analysis dealing with the broad scope of Korea in the historical context and key aspects of Korean food culture. Students are also required to participate actively in in-depth discussions.

Wednesdays 1:25pm-2:15pm.

Prerquisite:  KOR 204 or its equivalent.  If you want to take this class but have not taken KOR 204 or the Korean language placement test, please contact the instructor.

    • PORT 408.001.  Portuguese LAC: Queering the Portuguese-Speaking World in LGBTQIA+ Art and Activism

      Pedro Lopes de Almeida

      This is a stand-alone, one-hour LAC discussion course taught In Portuguese.  No co-registration.  This course will focus on four Portuguese-speaking countries on four different continents, learning about queer communities, struggles, activism, and art in Brazil, Angola, Portugal, and Timor-Leste.  As a LAC course, Abre a roda e entra no esquema (“Open the Circle and Get into It”, a line taken from a song by trans Angolan rapper MC Titica) will provide you with the tools to analyze, discuss, problematize, and develop creative approaches to contemporary trends in social movements in the Lusophone world, with an emphasis on LGBTQIA+ issues.  We will listen to music, study recent newspaper articles, watch movies, research social media content, read excerpts from novels, and host several guests (via Zoom).  This one-credit course can be taken in conjunction with the 1-credit series for students interested in 3-credits in Portuguese.

      Day/time: Wednesdays, 12:20pm-1:10pm

      Prerequisite: Portuguese 204, its equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

      SWAH 408.001.  Swahili LAC

      Raphael Birya

This is a stand-alone, one-hour LAC discussion course taught In Swahili.  No co-registration.

Day/time: Mondays, 1:25pm-2:15pm

About LAC at UNC-CH

UNC-CH’s LAC Program offers students the opportunity to use world languages in a variety of courses outside the language and literature curricula.

The program aims to promote a better understanding of world regions while demonstrating the relevance of practical language skills across the disciplines.

Successful completion of a LAC course option will improve students’ ability to:

      1. Communicate in the target language about course topics;
      2. Describe how course topics relate to world regions that speak the target language;
      3. Explain course topics from the perspective(s) of individuals who use the target language;
      4. Use the target language to conduct course research.

 

There are several types of LAC courses:

LAC Recitation Sections are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language offered for lecture courses that require a recitation section. LAC recitation sections function like normal recitations except that selected readings and assignments are completed in the target language. Students who participate in a LAC recitation receive one additional graded hour of language credit by enrolling in the corresponding LAC language course (ARAB 308, FREN 308, GERM 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408) in addition to main course’s corresponding LAC recitation section.

 

Supplementary LAC Discussion Sections are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language linked to courses that do not normally require a recitation section. Supplementary LAC sections enable students to complete short readings and assignments related to the linked course in the target language. Students who participate in a supplementary LAC section receive one graded hour of language credit by enrolling in the LAC language course (ARAB 308, CHIN 508, FREN 308, GERM 388 or 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408).

 

Combined LAC Discussion Sections are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language. These are linked to two or more related courses offered during the same semester. Students complete short readings and assignments in the target language on interdisciplinary themes or issues common to the linked courses. Students who participate in a combined LAC discussion section receive one graded hour of language credit by enrolling in a LAC language course (ARAB 308, CHIN, 508, FREN 308, GERM 388 or 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408).

 

Stand-Alone LAC Discussion Sessions are weekly 50-minute group discussions in the target language. These are not linked to any other course, and so the content is determined by the LAC instructor. Students complete short readings and assignments in the target language on interdisciplinary themes or issues These course may have varying thematic focus. Students who participate in a stand-alone LAC discussion section receive one graded hour of language credit by enrolling in a LAC language course (ARAB 308, FREN 308, GERM 389, ITAL 308, PORT 408, SPAN 308, or SWAH 408).

 

LAC Seminars are stand-alone three-credit courses taught entirely in the target language. Course identifiers may vary, so consult the present semester’s publicity or contact the LAC coordinator for current offerings.

 

LAC Research Components offer students the opportunity to complete course projects or papers in the target language, with assistance provided by a faculty member or graduate student. Students do not receive extra course credit, but are given a certificate of completion. Contact the LAC coordinator for current opportunities.

 

Teaching Associate Professor Michelle Gravatt currently serves as the point of contact for LAC courses. Please email her at gravatt@email.unc.edu with questions about the LAC program, to set up an appointment, learn about LAC teaching opportunities, or ask questions about what LAC courses are being offered and how to register. Please check this web page for updates.

Administration and Support

UNC-CH’s Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) program receives support from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as from six campus Title VI centers:

Diversity

The LAC Program supports the University’s core values encouraging diversity and equal educational and employment opportunities throughout the University community. These values are articulated in the University’s non-discrimination policy and by the office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.