LTL1
 

The Learning Through Languages Research Symposium is a unique way for your students to conduct and present preliminary research in their language of study. Eligible students include Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese or Spanish students, including heritage speakers, at Level III or higher.

Student participants:

  • Create teams of 2-3 students
  • Choose from four research tracks with regional focuses: Contemporary Asia, Europe, Latin America, or the Middle East and North Africa
  • Write a 2-3 page research paper on a topic related to the track of their choice
  • Create a project visual to present to UNC and Duke language instructors at the Symposium in December
  • Present their research to UNC and Duke faculty and language instructor judges in the target language
  • Come to UNC for the symposium and network with UNC and Duke faculty, staff, students, and other high school language learners from throughout the state

Your students:

  • Learn basic research methodology
  • Practice oral and written expression in a practical setting
  • Participate in cooperative learning
  • Use creativity and 21st century skills
  • Engage in global studies
  • Interact with UNC-CH and Duke faculty and language instructors

img_5791

The 2017 Learning Through Languages Symposium will take place in the UNC-CH Fedex Global Education Center in December 2017. Please check back for more details.

If you have questions about the program, please feel free to contact:

  • Emily Chavez, Outreach Coordinator, UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
  • Emma Harver, Program/Outreach Coordinator, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations
  • Noel Bynum, International Education Program Coordinator, UNC Center for European Studies
  • Sarah Brown, Outreach Assistant, Carolina Asia Center

The 2016 Learning Through Languages Symposium was organized by the Carolina Asia Center, the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, the UNC Center for European Studies, and the UNC-Duke Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Additional support for the event was provided by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, the Duke University Council for European Studies, the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, Qatar Foundation International, the UNC Center for Global Initiatives, the UNC Department of Asian Studies and the UNC Institute for the Study of the Americas.
The information below pertains to LTL2016. For names of winning teams and photos from LTL2015, please visit the LTL2015 page.

Press

Student Projects from LTL 2016

LTL 2
LTL 6
LTL 4
LTL 5

Testimonials

“Participating in Learning Through Languages has taught me so much. It has taught me how to research, how to make something interactive, how important it is to know what is going on in the world, how to cooperate, and so much more. It was so nice to be in a room filled with other students who have spent time learning another language, and who have as much of a passion as me, and my classmates, about language and other cultures.” – Student Participant

“The students loved the open atmosphere of the symposium. It was a great experience for them to interact with the judges and witness the impressive quality of work of other students across the state. They expressed that they would love to come back if given the opportunity again.” – Teacher Participant

“I am grateful that I had opportunity to showcase my language abilities and further my knowledge of Chinese through partaking in Learning Through Languages. It was encouraging to realize that there are other people, including college professors, who are just as passionate about my journey to learn Chinese as I am.” – Student Participant

Winning Teams

Best Use of Written and Oral Language (tie)

  • Zachary Johnson, Laura Meshnik and Dora Pekec from East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Valerie Huet, for “L’analyse Éthique de la Laïcité en France” (“An ethical analysis of secularism in France”)
  • Brendan Holly and Angela Chen from Chapel Hill High, teacher Christen Campbell, for “Tunisiennes retournées à un statut inférieur après le printemps arabe?” (“How have Tunisian women returned to an inferior status after the Arab Spring?”)

Honorable Mention of Best Use of Written and Oral Language

  • Jesko von Bernuth and Ryan Pecaut of East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Barbara Roeder, for “Warum haben Alte und Junge beim Brexit unterschiedlich gewählt?” (“Why did old and young choose differently in Brexit?”)
  • Sophia Janken and Makenna Meyer from East Chapel Hill High School for “Protestando la brutalidad policial: Como nuevas manifestaciones están peleando el sistema de violencia en Brasil” (“Protesting police brutality: How new protests are fighting the system of violence in Brazil”)

Best Scholarship

  • Zachary Johnson, Laura Meshnik and Dora Pekec from East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Valerie Huet, for “L’analyse Éthique de la Laïcité en France” (“An ethical analysis of secularism in France”)

Honorable Mention of Best Scholarship

  • Chris Hassel, Gabby Dimate and Kayla Merriweather from East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Justin Seifts, for “La pobreza cultural entre los indígenas del sur y sureste de Asia” (“Cultural poverty among Indigenous people in South and Southeast Asia”)

Best Visual Presentation

  • Rennica Huang, Yukiko Nakano and Xintong Xiang from East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Molly Brooks, for “Les Catastrophes Naturelles du Japon et des Méthodes de Prévention à L’Avenir” (“Natural disasters of Japan and methods of prevention in the future”)

Honorable Mention of Best Visual Presentation (tie)

  • Camille Harley, Peyton Skill, and Sean Jenkins from Cannon School, teacher Lirong Wang, for “从历史上看,美国对原油的渴望是怎样塑造它与中东国家之间的关系的?” (“How Has the Untied States’ Desire for Oil Historically Shaped its Relationship with Middle East Countries?”)
  • Hannah Petersen, Kayla Marr, and Courtney Pfister from Marvin Ridge High School, teacher Xiaohong Hu Mueller, for “How has Japan been affected by typhoons and other natural disasters? What methods are they using to prepare for future natural disasters?”
  • MaKenzie O’Brien, Sam Norvell, and Stephney Richard from Cannon School, teacher Sylvia Simard-Newman, for “La Désertification au Maghreb” (“Desertification in the Maghreb”)

Best Overall Research Project on Contemporary Asia

  • Chris Hassel, Gabby Dimate and Kayla Merriweather from East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Justin Seifts, for “La pobreza cultural entre los indígenas del sur y sureste de Asia” (“Cultural poverty among Indigenous people in South and Southeast Asia”)

Honorable Mention of Research Project on Contemporary Asia

  • Jillian Breithaupt, Grace Indledue, and Haruna Tsukiyama from Chapel Hill High School, teacher Yoshimi Yamagata Aoyagi, for “日本での早期外国語教育の改善” (“Improvement of early foreign language education in Japan”)

Best Overall Research Project on Contemporary Europe

  • Jesko von Bernuth and Ryan Pecaut of East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Barbara Roeder, for “Warum haben Alte und Junge beim Brexit unterschiedlich gewählt?” (“Why did old and young choose differently in Brexit?”)

Honorable Mention of Research Project on Contemporary Europe

  • Zachary Johnson, Laura Meshnik, and Dora Pekec from East Chapel Hill High School, teacher Valerie Huet, for “L’analyse Éthique de la Laïcité en France” (“An ethical analysis of secularism in France”)

Best Overall Research Project on Contemporary Middle East and North Africa

  • Brendan Holly and Angela Chen from Chapel Hill High School, teacher Christen Campbell, for “Comment sont les Tunisiennes retournées à un statut inférieur après le printemps arabe?” (“How have Tunisian women returned to an inferior status after the Arab Spring?”)

Honorable Mention of Research Project on Contemporary Middle East and North Africa

  • Abigail Shepard-Moore and Ecab Amor Vasquez from East Mecklenburg High School, teacher Diane Smith, for “La situation des droits des femmes au Maroc avant et après le Printemps arabe” (“The situation of women’s rights in Morocco before and after the Arab Spring”)

Best Overall Research Project on Contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Sophia Janken and Makenna Meyer from East Chapel Hill High School for “Protestando la brutalidad policial: Como nuevas manifestaciones están peleando el sistema de violencia en Brasil” (“Protesting police brutality: How new protests are fighting the system of violence in Brazil”)

Honorable Mention of Research Project on Southern Wayne High School

  • Clara Sánchez Arriola, Arineida Morales, and Luis Guzmán from Southern Wayne High School, teacher Mabel Eliana Lamprea, for “Crisis Política y Social en Venezuela” (“Political and Social Crisis in Venezuela”)